WHAT IT TAKES

HIV/AIDS and ORPHANS – A MAJOR SOCIAL PROBLEM

In many cases the young students are orphaned. AIDS has taken the lives of their parents, and they have witnessed this great personal tragedy.  Yet they have persevered  with their education and passed the highest standards in Secondary School, making them eligible to continue their training or education at local Universities, Colleges or Trade Schools.

students doing math equations
BASIC EDUCATION IS IMPORTANT

Educating African Youth is a gift of advanced training and education to young people who have lost their  parents  to AIDS or who live in poverty.

SOME CHILDREN HAVE SUPPORT

These two boys (below) were fortunate enough to have a caring grandmother and after both parents died of AIDS, she took over their upbringing. There are many grandmothers in this same position in Africa – and thanks to them, not as many end up as child parents or siblings in CHILD-HEADED homes.

Grandmother raises grandchildren after death of parents to AIDS

Having skills, a trade, and a base of knowledge gives any of us an advantage in a competitive world.

EDUCATING AFRICAN YOUTH helps these young people take the next step.  There are now 45 graduates.

GRADUATES ARE SOON EMPLOYED

A Graduate now at work
Graduate at work

Right now, there are another 14 in the queue getting their training. Upon graduation, with support from Rotarians, they will find jobs, set up shops to create their own jobs; become teachers, nurses, engineers, farmers, electricians, seamstresses, veterinarians,  pharmacists, dental assistants, carpenters, electricians, computer specialists, and the list goes on..

A LITTLE HISTORY

woman reading book

In 2013, the Rotary Club of Calgary completed a successful seven year project to support Ugandan AIDS orphans. TRACC stood for Taking Rotary Assistance to Communties and Children and assisted close to 700 AIDS orphans go to school, with the basics of living, food, counseling and community support. The Curly Galbraith Global Memorial took on students from the TRACC project to continue with advanced education. In 2020 the project was renamed Educating African Youth.

COSTS

Costs in Uganda are very low in comparison to the Western World. Approximately USD2,000 to USD3,000 is enough to pay tuition, other fees and room and board for 2 to 3 years of education/training resulting in a certificate, diploma or degree.

RESULTS

The impact is undeniable. Upon program completion, young adults, often without hope, regain the dignity and positive outlook that comes from finding a career and a purpose. Also, they set an example in their community and take the lead in reducing poverty in their own families. The success rate of graduates in securing employment or creating work is close to 100%